Chemical Requirements under TSD in Effect on July 20, 2013

July 16, 2013 | The Toy Industry Association (TIA) is reminding manufacturers, importers and retailers of toys intended for sale in Europe that new chemical requirements under the revised European Toy Safety Directive (TSD) will go into effect on July 20, 2013.

The TSD 2009/48/EC requires companies to evaluate and carry out a safety assessment of all toys before placing them on the market, by analyzing the potential chemical and non-chemical (physical, mechanical, electrical, flammability, hygiene and radioactivity) hazards that a toy may present and assessing the potential exposure to such hazards. 

Three chemical standards recently published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) must be complied with in light of the upcoming July 20, 2013 TSD effective date for all chemical requirements:

  • EN 71-3 – Migration of certain elements (revision)
    Note: This revision increases the number of heavy elements which are regulated from the current eight to 19.

  • EN 71-5 – Chemical toys (sets) other than experimental sets (revision)

  • EN 71-12 – N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosatable substances (new standard)
    Note: EN 71-12 only covers toys for children under three or those that are intended to be placed in the mouth; in Germany, additional rules apply for N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosatable substances in toys that are likely to be placed in the mouth. Toys sold in Germany must comply with these additional requirements.

The revised TSD contains amendments across virtually all safety aspects related to toys, reflecting the latest health and safety standards. The TSD came into effect on July 20, 2011, with the exception of chemical requirements. All U.S. toy companies that import products to Europe are advised to ensure that they are in compliance with the new chemical requirements by the July 20, 2013 effective date. More information about the revised Directive, including an explanatory guidance document, can be found online. A complete list of Toy Safety Standards Around the World can be viewed on the International Council of Toy Industries (ICTI) website.