Industry Statements

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The Toy Association’s Statement Re: U.S. PIRG’s 2017 Trouble in Toyland Report
November 21, 2017
 
Many of the items named in U.S. PIRG’s supposed “Trouble in Toyland” report were previously recalled due to ongoing regulatory vigilance, and are no longer offered for sale. In typical fashion, PIRG has resorted to simply listing recalled toys because they couldn’t find safety violations among the toys that are currently on the market. As a result, the group is needlessly frightening parents and caregivers during what is supposed to be a joyful time of year.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Bisphenol-A (BPA)
October 31, 2017
 
The Toy Association assures parents and caregivers that Bisphenol-A (BPA) is safe for use in toys, given both its limited scope of use and limited risk of exposure in toy and game products.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Button Cell Batteries
October 31, 2017
 
The U.S. toy industry is committed to ensuring the safety of children. Batteries – especially small, button- and coin-size batteries – can pose a serious health hazard if swallowed.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Cadmium and Heavy Metals
October 31, 2017
 
Toys* sold in the United States are prohibited from containing heavy metals or any other substances that can result in harmful exposure to children. By law, toy companies must ensure that their products are in compliance with all relevant standards, regulations,

 
The Toy Association Statement on Chemicals in Toys
October 31, 2017
 
All toys sold in the U.S. must comply with 100+ strict toy safety regulations, tests, and requirements designed to protect children at play, including the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, the Consumer Product Safety Act, and the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act. Among other protections, these regulations make it illegal to sell toys or children’s products containing substances harmful to children and to which they might be exposed.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Digital Apps for Children
October 31, 2017
 
The Toy Association believes that children derive great benefit from a well-rounded day of play that can involve a combination of many types of toys, including digital playthings.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Fidget Spinners
October 31, 2017
 
As with any object found in a child’s environment, parents and caregivers should take precautions to ensure their children are using fidget spinners safely.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Flame Retardants
October 31, 2017
 
Safety is the toy industry’s top priority. All toys sold in the United States must conform to stringent federal safety standards such as the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, and the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Holiday “Toy-related“ Injuries
October 31, 2017
 
Safety is the toy industry’s top priority every day of the year. By law, all toys sold in the United States, no matter where in the world they are produced, must meet more than 100 rigorous safety standards and test requirements to ensure the safety of children at play.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Lasers in Toys
October 31, 2017
 
Recent concern regarding children’s exposure to lasers is due in large part to increasing numbers of low-cost, compact laser pointers that are not intended for children’s use. Although adults may use these laser pointers for work, kids might purchase and use them for amusement.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Lead
October 31, 2017
 
Working alongside medical experts and government officials, The Toy Association helped establish the first federal standards for lead in children’s products nearly 40 years ago.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Magnets in Toys
October 31, 2017
 
Magnets can provide a fun and educational component to a toy. Strict federal toy safety standards prohibit the use of certain powerful magnets in any piece of a toy that is small enough to be swallowed and is intended for children under 14 years old.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Packaging / Environmental Sustainability
October 31, 2017
 
Though toys comprise less than 1 percent of the typical household waste stream, there is an industry-wide understanding that everyone has a role to play in support of sustainability.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Phthalates
October 31, 2017
 
Specific restrictions on the presence of phthalates – ingredients that make some plastics soft and pliable – in toys and child care articles are defined in Section 108 of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), a federal law that was passed in 2008.

 
The Toy Association Statement on Play and Healthy Lifestyles
October 31, 2017
 
The Toy Association and its members are proud of the important, life-shaping role that toys, games, and play have in the development and growth of children. With the rise in childhood obesity rates sparking public health concerns, parents are rallying alongside medical professionals to encourage more active play – that which stimulates the body by encouraging kids to run, jump, and stretch.

 
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