Industry Statements

The Toy Association Statement on Magnets in Toys

Magnets can provide a fun and educational component to a toy. Strict federal toy safety standards prohibit the use of certain powerful magnets in any toy part that is small enough to be swallowed and is intended for children under 14 years old.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Recalls

Because its products are intended specifically for children, the toy industry holds itself to a particularly high standard of safety. All toys sold in the United States, no matter where they are produced, must conform to rigorous safety standards and laws.

 

The Toy Association Statement on the Use of XRF Technology

The Toy Association believes that X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) technology may be reliably used as an initial screening mechanism, in the hands of a well-trained operator, for detecting the potential presence of certain substances in toys – as long as prescribed test methods are followed and the appropriate standard reference materials are used. A “positive” XRF result merely indicates that further comprehensive testing must be done by a government-accredited lab to confirm the presence of the substance.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Phthalates

Specific restrictions on the presence of phthalates – ingredients that make some plastics soft and pliable – in toys and child care articles are defined in Section 108 of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), a federal law that was passed in 2008.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Toy Guns and Violence

The Toy Association and its members are proud of the important, life-shaping role that toys, games, and play have in the development and growth of children.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Toy Safety and the U.S. PIRG Annual Toy Reports

Each year around this time there are several things we have come to count on – one is the annual list of alleged “toys to avoid” created by groups such as U.S. PIRG.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Packaging / Environmental Sustainability

Though toys comprise less than 1 percent of the typical household waste stream, there is an industry-wide understanding that everyone has a role to play in support of sustainability.

 

The Toy Association Statement on the Safety of Toys Made Outside of the U.S.

Consumers have every reason to trust the safety of the three billion toys sold in America each year. All toys sold in the U.S., regardless of where they are made, must comply with strict U.S. standards. It is the responsibility of the companies selling products in this country to make sure that those toys are safe. Regular testing and certification by government-approved, independent laboratories provides an additional verification of a company’s compliance with our country’s strict federal regulations.  

 

The Toy Association Statement on Button Cell Batteries

The U.S. toy industry is committed to ensuring the safety of children. Batteries – especially small button- and coin-size batteries – can pose a serious health hazard if swallowed. If they lodge in the esophagus, the results can be life-threatening and immediate medical intervention is needed.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Flame Retardants

Safety is the toy industry’s top priority. All toys sold in the United States must conform to stringent federal safety standards such as the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, and the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act. Not only do these toy safety standards contain tough flammability requirements, they also restrict the use of substances known to be harmful to children and to which children might be exposed.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Chemicals in Toys

All toys sold in the U.S. must comply with 100+ strict toy safety regulations, tests, and requirements designed to protect children at play, including the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, the Consumer Product Safety Act, and the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act. Among other protections, these regulations make it illegal to sell toys or children’s products containing substances harmful to children and to which they might be exposed.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Cadmium and Heavy Metals

Toys* sold in the United States are prohibited from containing heavy metals or any other substances that can result in harmful exposure to children. By law, toy companies must ensure that their products comply with all relevant standards, regulations, and tests – including applicable heavy metal limits – before they can be sold in this country.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Bisphenol-A (BPA)

The Toy Association assures parents and caregivers that any Bisphenol-A (BPA) found in toys is safe, given its limited scope of use, minuscule amounts present, and limited risk of exposure in toy and game products.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Digital Play and Screen Time

The Toy Association and its members are proud of the important, life-shaping role that toys, games, and play have in the development and growth of young minds and bodies.

 

The Toy Association Statement on Small Parts Regulation

The federally-mandated small parts regulation that has been in place in the U.S. for more than four decades was established using research from the American Academy of Pediatrics, child development experts, government officials, and others. These requirements take into account the physiological makeup of a child.